My favourite is fig and licorice, what’s yours?

Randal Rauser has yet another excellent post: “Why conservatism is often riskier than you might think (and other observations on losing faith)” in which among other sensible stuff (that you really should read, if you don’t already subscribe to his blog) he says: A Christianity (liberal or conservative) which doesn’t present its adherents with a […]

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Why proprietary file-formats are bad for institutions

A growing institution that despite growth is somewhat strapped for cash has most of its staff on OfficeProduct 2006, it less than the latest thing, but does everything the staff need. New staff are employed (it is a growing institution) new laptops are bought, they come with OfficeProduct X an easily “upgradeable trial version”. So, […]

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2 Biblical Talk of the Motherly God: A Personal God without Icons

The God of the Bible is aniconic,1 meaning never to be painted, sculpted or drawn. The second commandment forbids all idols, even images of the true God. In a world of gods and goddesses, both sculpted and drawn, the Bible pictures God with words alone. Yet God is person, not an abstract philosophical concept. The […]

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The Third Preposition: Bible was not written to/for/about you

In my previous post Canaanite Genocide and another new (to me) blog I mentioned the interesting discussion in the comments on the post The Bible wasn’t written for David Ker. One interesting detail is the possible (mis)reading  of David’s title The Bible was not written to you as The Bible was not written for you. […]

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Canaanite Genocide and another new (to me) blog

In the comments (which are perhaps more enlightening than the post) to The Bible wasn’t written for David Ker the eponymous David (or should be be called the pseudonymous Lingamish?) points to a superb article1 : Randal Rauser. “‘Let Nothing that Breathes Remain Alive’ On the Problem of Divinely Commanded Genocide.” Philosophia Christi 11, no. […]

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