Biblical understandings of human gender: Part Five: Corresponding

In previous posts in this series I have been critical of Wayne Grudem’s interpretations of Gen 1-3: Biblical understandings of human gender: Part One: Beginnings Biblical understandings of human gender: How to read the Bible: Larger passages trump verses Biblical understandings of human gender: Part Two: The creation of human gender Biblical understandings of human […]

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E/egalitarian and/or C/complementarian?

On Facebook yesterday I was prompted to reflect on the oddities that our herd mentality imposes on humans. We often signal words that name these “herds” linguistically (rightly or wrongly)1 by giving nouns that name human herds capital letters. Thus I am catholic but not Catholic in my tastes.2 Capitalisation to indicate herd membership is […]

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Jesus and talk of God as father (part one)

At present I’m thinking and talking a lot about Jesus’ talk of God as father, and whether this naming of God means that Christians cannot think of God as (also) motherly. The Old Testament used both father and mother-language to speak about God, but it used both seldom. Language such as shepherd, kinsman-redeemer, king, rock, […]

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Biblical sense and sensibility

Open Bible has a fascinating on post Applying Sentiment Analysis to the Bible. Sentiment analysis involves algorithmically determining if a piece of text is positive (“I like cheese”) or negative (“I hate cheese”). Think of it as Kurt Vonnegut’s story shapes backed by quantitative data. The post started with a plot of the data for […]

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Biblical Studies blog and podcasts of September

The biblical studies carnival(s) is(are) up at Scotteriology. Scot provides both smaller and larger versions, illustrating the dearth of nominations, and the work required to produce a good carnival from all the now huge number of blogs and podcasts dealing seriously with the Bible. Enjoy both the results of nominations: September Biblioblog Carnival: The “Lesser” And […]

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