Books are hot (Marshall McLuhan)??

There’s a provocative little discussion on Edge “What do you think Marshall McLuhan would have said about ebooks? How do they change the message of books?” You may pick other takeways, but mine is the thought from Douglas Rushkoff (neatly reversing/correcting Clay Shirky) on how McC’s famous “hot vs. cold” distinction among media might play […]

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Reviews and the society of scholarship

RBL (the SBL’s Review of Biblical Literature) is an innovative and interesting journal. It fulfills the important, but unglamorous, scholarly task of organising and publishing reviews of new book-length work in the field. So far so useful but ordinary. RBL has also pioneered the electronic publication of these reviews while retaining a print edition.1 It […]

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Free Open Source Textbooks Project

AKMA has suggested (though it is phrased as a question: Time for FOSOT(NT)T? I think it was really a suggestion) that it is perhaps time to really start seriously on the project of producing a Free Open Source Textbook (probably as a prototype for a possible series).  Brooke (another initial primary discussant) seems both willing […]

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SBL and the digital communications revolution

There is an interesting confluence in aspects of two significant documents that John Kutsko (SBL) pointed me towards. Today was a news item in Inside Higher Ed, it’s titled The Promise of Digital Humanities and reports on a meeting celebrating (US) NEH grants to digital humanities projects. Among the items that caught my eye was a […]

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How paper is better than e-books

If yesterday’s post seemed a trifle touchy, it’s because the author I was criticising was himself unbalanced. I can rectify that today thanks to Jim W who pointed to this: 5 Ways That Paper Books Are Better Than eBooks this list is balanced and sensible, it takes the technological differences into account and points out […]

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