Sansblogue

biblical studies : bible : digital : food

Browsing Posts in Teaching

Since this session concerns the background to the emergence of “Israel” in Canaan the Mereneptah Stele is mentioned and shown several times, photo from Wikipedia When Jacob Wright’s MOOC “The Bible’s Prehistory, Purpose, and Political Future” was announced and promoted I posted about it on Facebook. I’ve enrolled and have begun the first week (the […]

After thirty years as an onsite teacher, though for the last several years teaching many distance classes, I am now a distance teacher. I used to work from an office at the institution I was teaching in, with the luxury of research and writing days/time at home. This was true whether I was teaching distance […]

Here’s a post from five years ago that I wish had generated more conversation… I wonder if it will this time ;) Linking to Geoff’s “Creativity in Theological Education” post and then watching the brilliant presentation (in just 20 minutes) by Sugata Mitra the Indian “Hole in the Wall” man (on TED) “Can kids teach […]

Since I signed up as a MOOC student, I’m seeing MOOCs everywhere ;) Clay Shirkey, always a provocative and often a prescient commentator has an interesting take on the state of higher education. His starting point is cost benefit. In the USA the cost of a basic bachelor’s degree rose 75% in the first ten […]

I’ve signed up for the MIT’s Learning Creative Learning MOOC (Massively Open Online Course). There are apparently 25,000 of us, though at present it is all a bit confusing and seems slow to start. I’ll use posts here to reflect both on what I learn, and on the process. Since the first week got off […]

Here is an extract from the long video I linked to the other day. The extract covers reasons why we should teach theology to adults and children together.

Back in 2004 on the 15th of November I was also bogged down in marking (is there nothing new under the sun?) so i posted this little gem: Blame Steve Taylor for this post, that or the end of the year has finally got to me… But Steve’s post “everyday spirituality of ironing” which reads: […]

One of the interesting results of nearing retirement from Carey is that I find myself becoming more aware of “elephants in the room”. Somehow while I was still counting my remaining teaching at Carey in multiple years they remained, by and large, unnoticed. In this post I’d like to address the “elephant” of struggling students. […]

I’ve always had a sneaking envy of physics teachers. Their subject comes with such a neat set of well understood and widely agreed (almost universally1 principles and concepts. In biblical studies everything is so frustratingly a matter of (almost always widely) different interpretations and approaches. But now I have another reason to envy physics teachers. […]

I realise that in my enthusiasm for the infographic I probably didn’t explain well what I meant in my last post: Flip, this is good. Teaching on this model would involve groups of students together (and separately) addressing a series of issues or situations (carefully chosen and prepared case studies, or actual situations that come […]