Camouflage Equivalence: another example

Back in April I somehow missed Bryan Bibb’s interesting post Camouflage Equivalence1 it focuses on places where translators: …seek to obscure rather than reveal the meaning of the original. He [Robinson] defines the term as “rearranging the semantic elements of the original… in a plausible way that disguises their dynamic meaning” (p. 6). The idea, […]

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The heresy of exhortation

Marking a lot of assignments where students examine different Bible passages, in an institution that seeks to prepare people in Applied Theology, and so expects exegesis to find its natural outworking in application, submits me to a great deal of exhortation. The vast majority of students reach the application stage of the process, and promptly […]

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The censored Bible: translating Psalm 90

Aristotle’s Feminist Subject has a post in which various translationsof Psalm 90 are compared. As always I’m astounded by the way most treat verse 2: בְּטֶרֶם׀  הָרִים  יֻלָּדוּ וַתְּחֹולֵל  אֶרֶץ  וְתֵבֵל וּמֵעֹולָם עַד־עֹולָם  אַתָּה  אֵל׃ Before the mountains were born or you gave birth to the earth and the world, from everlasting to everlasting you […]

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