The injustice of traditional higher education and online classes

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Blog posts get less editing and polishing than other forms of writing, I think I may have failed to make my point clearly in the preceding post. So I will make it concisely here, see the other post for background and explanations. Many people do not suit traditional classroom based higher education. There are logistical […]

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The end of Higher Education

From Shopware.de

Christopher B. Hays commented on Facebook on a post “The End of College? Not So Fast” by Donald E. Heller. These posts and the comments prompted this reflection on my own experience. The Chronicle of Higher Education post also suggested my title, which deliberately mimics, but perhaps by removing the question mark subverts theirs. First […]

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Numbers 20: a reading and some critical readers needed

The venerable (I think it is the longest-running religious periodical in NZ) Baptist has had a makeover for 2015.No longer newsprint, and with a web edition that looks pretty good. The trouble is most of the writers are (to put it politely) experienced, and most of the readers inherited from the old format newsprint are (frankly) old […]

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Review of the Logos edition of Douglas Mangum et al., Genesis 1–11 (Lexham Bible Guide, Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012).

LogosWarning

The series of which this “volume” is a part has an ambitious but mixed goal: The series is designed to be a research tool. Each guide presents a wide range of interpretive issues raised by Bible scholars. These resources meet the needs of those studying the Bible in academic settings, but the broad scope of […]

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“Mission Trips” and sanctified holidays

It was near here we were first offered (and accepted) rat to eat.

The photo above shows the countryside near where we were first offered rat to eat :) The issue of “mission trips”, and the appropriateness of this arrogant terminology, has been raised again in the circles I frequent on Facebook. I’ve aired my thoughts on this before, first pointing to Vinodth Ramachandra’s fine post Who Says […]

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