King David as a terrible warning

Poster for the film 'David and Bathsheba'.

The old film, David and Bathsheba, may have been nominated for Oscars, but there is no indication in the Bible text that the start of this story was a ‘love affair’, watch how David and Bathsheba interact and draw your own conclusions.

I’ve recently been watching students discuss the story of David, Bathsheba, and Uriah in 2 Sam 11-12. I have also been watching the Christian media in the USA discuss Bill Hybels and how the Willow Creek organisation has responded to accusations against him.

In some ways the two stories seem not at all alike. It sounds as if Hybels is not accused of adultery, still less of the level of abuse of power that the quasi-rape of Bathsheba revealed in the king after God’s own heart. Hybels has not organised a death to cover up his sin.

There is, however, a similarity at the heart of the two stories. In Samuel, Saul, for all his failings, remained a king in name, but with few of the trappings of kingship as the ancient Near East understood them, while David accumulates the toys that went with royal status: palace and palace guard, courtiers and advisors, and even leisure-time…

This is what leads him into temptation and disastrous  failure (notice what he is doing at the start of 1 Sam 11). I could not, therefore, help noticing this sentence in the report about Hybels:

That meant a number of one-on-one meetings: often at his beach home in Michigan, on his yacht, on his jet, or at restaurants near Hybels’s summer home.

We can argue forcefully that some of these things are potentially quite harmless, restaurant meals for example. Some of us may have a family bach or even ‘beach home’. Yet the sum total speaks of the sort of privilege our culture sees as the ‘right’ of k̶i̶n̶g̶s powerful leaders.

4 comments on “King David as a terrible warning

  1. GLYN CARPENTER

    Fair comment Tim

  2. tim

    That seems to me the saddest thing here, not that another leader was probably a fool and perhaps a lecher, that is no surprise in a fallen world, but that another church allowed its leader to act like a king!

    1. Glyn Carpenter

      It’s especially challenging when we acknowledge that we all live with huge affluence relative to most in the world today
      .

  3. tim

    Oh, yes. And that inequality like the ones given within Western societies to celebrities (whether pastors or rugby players) can so easily lead to abuse.