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Canapés au bout danois

Photo and original idea from MacSween

Here’s a simple, fairly quick, impressive finger food that foodies will love, and will convert (most) Black Pudding skeptics.1

Ingredients:

  • Slices of precut grainy bread (about one per person)
  • Black Pudding
  • Tomatoes (small ones you’ll need 3-4 slices for each slice of bread)
  • Blue cheese
  • Walnut pieces (not too small, but not whole halves)

Method:

Take a few slices of grainy bread2 wipe with garlic3 spray with cooking oil4 sprinkle with salt and toast5

While the toast is popping from the toaster slice your black pudding into enough thin rounds. Fry them, having ensured the fry pan is hot, so a water droplet dances, before spraying the pan with oil.

Meanwhile cut small tomatoes into slices.6

Cut small lumps of blue cheese, Kaimai Creamy Blue is ideal, a softer blue works better than the Stilton sort.

Cut the toasts into rounds by pressing the cutter7 firmly. Assemble by placing one slice of Black Pudding, one of tomato on each round, and top off with a piece of walnut pressed into the blue cheese.

Voila Canapés au bout danois!

And more people converted into Black Pudding fans ;) BTW the left over bits of toast can be warmed in the morning in the pan as you fry more Black Pudding, and with any left over bits of tomato, and some blue cheese makes a fine breakfast, Breakfast au Bouts Danois8

  1. “bout danois” which would mean something like a Danish end or a Danish leftover but to most non-Francophones just sounds posh and mysterious is a pun on Boudin Noir = Black Pudding. []
  2. You will get about 3-4 canapés per slice if you use an eggcup as your cutter. Four slices made  enough for a starter for four hungry people, and leftovers for breakfast for one :) []
  3. I dipped a teaspoon in crushed garlic let the lumps drip off and wiped that over one face of a slice. []
  4. For you do surely have a plastic spray dispenser like they sell for misting flowers etc. for $5 filled with Soya Oil, or some such, don’t you? If you don’t you should, aside from spraying stuff to get a very light misting of oil it lets you fry with less fat! []
  5. Yes, they will go in the electric toaster, no worries. []
  6. If your tomatoes are too big do NOT despair, just cut the slices in half later. []
  7. Or egg cup ;) []
  8. No, do NOT add walnuts this time, that would be greedy, what are you a pig? []

Roast fennel and potato with safron

Lunch :) aka roast fennel and potato with safron

It’s autumn :) I got some lovely big juicy and cheap organic fennel bulbs the other day at Green Rebel (now Fresh) on Dominion Rd. They are big and juicy, but perhaps have been left to get a bit overgrown, so may be tough. This recipe is ideal, the stock provides steam to soften them a little, while getting the potatoes beautifully crisp.

  • Potatoes (I used about 8 small ones for a two person portion) cut and boiled for 6-10 mins
  • Onions (I used six small red ones) peeled and cut in half or quarters
  • Fennel Bulb (I used one huge organic one, I guess two or three supermarket midgets) cut
  • Stock half a cup (for this 2 portion size) with saffron soaking in it while the veges are getting cut, 1 Tbsp balsamic and a tsp or two of sugar
  • garlic 1/2 a head chopped
  • teaspoon each fennel seeds crushed and paprika
  • bay leaves, several, and thyme several sprigs (if you MUST you can probably used dried but surely you have a few thyme plants in a pot somewhere, no one but you will see they look straggly at this season because they’ll char away, just leaving that lovely aroma, the burnt bay leaves should be removed by hand before serving ;)
  • Olive oil 2-3 Tbsp

Spread the autumnal bounty (dry ingredients) around a baking tray, pour on the stock and oil, place in oven at 190C (about 375F for Americans and anyone stuck in a time warp). Turn over with a slice every ten minutes or so till beautifully golden and burnt. Eat straight from the oven, with seasoning. Forget you intended to keep half for this evening and wish you’d done double quantity :)

PS: if you follow the chef’s advice (my son Nathan) and keep your vege peelings to make stock this recipe is even Vegan as well as delicious :) I confess to having used some bones from a dead chicken to make my stock – I must get better organised ;)